doing TODAY and not getting caught in the HYPE of tomorrow

Alan Williamson

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Latest Articles from Alan Williamson
Speaking of responses, I'd like to take this opportunity to redress the balance here. Over the past couple of months I've received some very abusive e-mail from disgruntled readers, shouting the odds about a number of things. First of all, I have no problem receiving e-mail from reader...
I'd like to introduce you to a new JDJ series consisting of selected excerpts from my current book, Java Servlets: By Example. I've put a number of chapters into article format, hoping they'll give you some insight into the world of servlets and the sort of things we have to do at the ...
When I sat down to write this month's column I tried desperately to come up with something. I was beginning to panic, as nothing seemed to come to mind. Then I took a wee walk and munched down on some pizza. Suddenly, BANG! The whole month's activities came flooding back to me. So kick...
Welcome one and all to this month's dose of nonsense and trivia from the world of Java. December was a rather fun-filled month, with many things happening that will affect us all in the near future. I'm sure you've all heard about the controversy with Sun and IBM. But more on that late...
When all is said and done, I hope you're reading this column ­ the first in the new millennium ­ in familiar surroundings. With any luck, the prophets of doom around the Y2K problem have been proved wrong and the world didn't stop spinning suddenly in a haze of apocalyptic fireworks. I...
Founder, JavaLobby http://www.JavaLobby.org The .Net 'master brand' touches every one of Microsoft's business units, and the company appears to be more organized, aligned and excited than I have ever seen it.
(October 11, 2002) - Alan Williamson, JDJ editor-in-chief, interviewed Jeremy Allaire, CTO, Macromedia, Inc., to get the rundown on how Java developers can take advantage of JRun4, ColdFusion MX, and Flash Remoting. JDJ: With CFMX in the field for nearly 3 months now, how has the ado...
(November 8, 2002) - As controversy swirled around the validity of the .NET vs J2EE benchmarking results posted this week by The Middleware Company, JDJ editor-in-chief Alan Williamson went straight to TMC for their side of the story. JDJ: Did TMC approach Microsoft with respect to th...
JDJ: What is your role in the Java 2 Enterprise Edition, and what do you see as its strength? Roth: We're extending the Java platform from its traditional base on the desktop all the way into server-centric space. We want to take write once, run anywhere and extend it all the way to th...
(May 29, 2003) - I am pleased to announce Joseph Ottinger as our new J2EE editor for Java Developer's Journal. Joe is no stranger to JDJ, having penned a number of guest editorials for us in the previous year.
(January 24, 2003) - What are the shortcomings of traditional developer training, and how can it be improved? For answers, JDJ editor-in-chief Alan Williamson recently spoke with Partha Nageswaran, lead technical architect and founder of Trans-World Resources, the New Jersey-based J2EE...
Well, here we are again, decking the halls with boughs of holly, fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la, and all that sort of nonsense... The time of year when the opportunity to steal a kiss from the secretary isn't an actionable offense (assuming, of course, that you catch her - or him - under t...
This has been a busy and bizarre month. A number of weird and wonderful things have happened, and I'll take you through them one by one.
What a month this one has been! Life has this wonderful way of letting you know that no matter what you're feeling at any given moment, you just can't predict what's going to be round the next corner. One of our chaps is at this precise moment lying flat on his back, bored senseless, i...
Every time I come around to writing this, I have this fear: What the hell am I going to write about? Then I sit back and have a think of what has happened in the last month and what is likely to happen in the forthcoming month and something usually presents itself. Fortunately, Mother ...
Where were you in mid-June 1999, between the 15th and the 18th? I know where at least 20,000 of you were: Moscone Center, San Francisco.
I don't know about you, but these months are shooting by at a tremendous rate of knots. Here we are again, into the latter half of the year...and I was just getting used to being back after Christmas. It's all very exciting, racing up to the day that dare not speak its name: yes, the b...
Thirteen ­ or as I prefer it ­ 26 over 2. Yes, this is article number (26 over 2) in the series, and the more superstitious of you will know this isn't the luckiest of numbers. So with fingers crossed, let's delve into this month's rants and raves and see what pops out.
Can you believe it? I know I certainly can't. This column is officially celebrating its twelfth issue, and being the mathematical genius that I am ­ and since this joyous magazine is printed on a monthly schedule ­ I can safely deduce that our first year anniversary is upon us. Fanta...
Is it me, or are the months flying past? It seems like only last week I was sitting down writing this column, hoping to bring a little happiness into your lives. This month, fortunately, I have a lot to tell you about the wonderful world of Java as seen through the eyes of a European ...
Last month I came to you as a developer as opposed to a CEO. Well, this time I'm moving up the social ladder and I'm writing in the capacity of a user. I'd like to tell you a little story that scared the living daylights out of me. Continuing on the "Ally McBeal" theme from l...
I'm going to write this editorial as a developer, not as a CEO. Not specifically a Java developer, but a generic, abstract developer - someone that is involved with shaping tomorrow's software. I'm a very worried man. If I were to be a TV character, I would be "the Biscuit" f...
Just in case you don't know, I love Java. This month was a good month for loving Java. Some months, I have to confess, one does curse the little guy, but this month he was standing tall. Nothing of particular note happened in the media world, but it was something we did that made us s...
Welcome to your monthly dose of controversy - the part of the magazine where I ask you to push back the keyboard, stop debugging that Java class that has been bugging you for the past couple of hours and get your shot of caffeine as I invite you to take a look at this crazy Java univer...
Here we are again - a couple of pages telling you how it really is. What an interesting and varied month this has been! And a good month for Java. Lots of different things have been happening.
HALT! Just stop right there! You've probably stumbled across this column while merrily thumbing through this magazine, and you're now wondering what this lump of words is all about. You may have noticed this column in previous issues but couldn't be bothered to read it. After all, who'...
This month I'm going to go down the route of employment, because here at N-ARY, we're going through the painful process of recruiting. As usual, I'm going to analogize my findings with a human personality trait - this month I'm going to go for loyalty. But I'll come back to that in a m...
It's that time of year again - the time when we all pretend to get along with one another for a few weeks. It's the time for families to come out of the woodwork, for getting out that knitted pullover from the Auntie whose name you can never quite remember. I can't wait until the New Y...
Morning or is it afternoon? It could even be evening. Whatever it is, welcome. Another month has rolled in and we're now sailing dangerously close to that Christmas mark again. Goodness, where has the year gone? I've no idea. This is my wee corner of the journalistic minefield of the c...
Here we are again, back for another look at the underbelly of Java. Those of you that don't know what I write about, stay tuned; those that do, feel free to jump to the next paragraph. Straight talking is what we do here. We strip away all the hype and look under the cover of the Java ...
The year isn't long, is it? Time seems to be whipping along at a tremendous pace. It seems like only a couple of weeks ago that we were at JavaOne talking over all things Java with anyone prepared to listen. We spoke to Sun, IBM and Oracle, to name but a few of the big boys. Now, Oracl...
Come, friends, family and passersby, welcome to the start of a new column, from the good old keyboard of Alan Williamson. Some of you may have read my previous column under the banner name of 'Visual Cafe.' That column looked at various aspects of the Java language, including such g...
Data! You can't live without it. Wherever you go, whatever you touch, information is continually being flashed before us. It wasn't so long ago that people were complaining of not having enough information and now our medical experts are telling us to take days off due to the informati...
Data is one of those housekeeping duties that has to be performed by everyone who uses a computer. Whatever level they are on, somewhere along the line data is stored, files are created and directories are made.
Data You just can't get away from it. No matter what you do, a certain amount of data is always generated. One of the more profound quotes of the day can be attributed to Peter Large of Information Anxiety, where he once said: "More Information has been produced in the last 30 yea...
Introduction Just when you were beginning to get the hang of Java and had figured out it was more than just an animation tool, out comes yet another Java-related technology, complete with its own set of rules and conditions to dazzle and confuse. But what is so special about this new o...
From the very first steps this column took, a journey of discovery was promised which, hopefully, has not disappointed. Using Visual Cafe as our development platform, we have ventured into areas of Java that others have feared to tread. From building complete applets with database conn...
In our last column we addressed one of the most commonly asked questions regarding the sending of e-mail from within a Java applet or application. This was achieved using the SMTP protocol, and by the end of the article a fully functional SMTP class was constructed. Before we continue ...
This column looks at the construction of an Intranet-based contact manager known as Informer. In previous articles, I have looked at the building blocks of Informer, and how easy it was to use Symantec's dbAnywhere package to provide all of the database connectivity. For those of you f...
In our last article, we introduced what is now our column project: Informer. Informer is a small contact database application that is designed to provide contact information about various personnel over an Intranet or Internet. The idea for this project evolved from one of our N-ARY de...